Michael Lavorgna writes glowingly about Yuko Mabuchi Trio in AudioStream

Check out the glowing review of the Yuko Mabuchi Trio in AudioStream. [Yuko Mabuchi Trio] is so good in terms of the music, musicianship and sound quality… The detail, sense of space and most importantly, dynamics, are thrilling. It is rare in the audiophile world to get such a perfect pairing of compelling music and sound quality. This recording is available on many of the usual download sites and in many flavors of DSD and PCM. I downloaded the album from NativeDSD at DSD 128 resolution. Highly recommended. Read more at about the Yuko Mabuchi Trio at AudioStream.

Luxuriating: The Yuko Mabuchi Trio (2017)

…Yuko Mabuchi takes command of both her instrument and the listener’s ears from the first stroke of the album’s opener, Cole Porter mainstay, “What Is This Thing Called Love” and through all eight live-recorded masterpiece tracks.  Produced by Randy Bellous… the live album is a must-own for piano trio aficionados and jazz lovers of all stripes. A tremendous highlight of the album is… “On Green Dolphin Street.”  Pitched in Bill Evans’ preferred key of E-flat…. Dave Brubeck himself would have applauded the tight interplay of time between one half of the head, presented in a heavy ¾ that alternates sweetly with the straight ‘four-on-the-floor’ 4/4 of the next four bars of the same phrase….  Mabuchi, delicious bassist Del Atkins, and tasty drummer Bobby Breton make it new all over again…. Mabuchi’s right hand is the star of each of her solo flights.  Clean, precise, and crisp like forebears Teddy Wilson, Continue Reading →

Read Jeff Wilson’s review of Yuko Mabuchi Trio in The Absolute Sound

If the eponymous debut album by the Yuko Mabuchi Trio can be seen as a coming out party, it’s hard to imagine the musicians squeezing anything more out of the event. The nearly hour-long set includes some well-known jazz standards, including a gorgeous On Green Dolphin Street and an exuberant romp through Sonny Rollins’ St. Thomas. During a solo piano medley, Mabuchi’s reconstruction of Take the “A” Train displays a fertile imagination and a confident left hand. A sly reading of Sara Bareilles’ Seriously shows Mabuchi’s ability to spot a pop song that translates nicely into the jazz idiom. Her interpretive skills also surface on a composition by TAS music reviewer Mark Lehman, Waltz Noir; here the trio uses a classical composition as a launch pad for some highly evocative noir jazz. If Mabuchi’s playing can be described as tasteful, economical, and lyrical, it should also be noted that her Continue Reading →